Online Translation Training

Online Translation Training

Top 10 Benefits of Completing a Translation Training Online

There are many benefits to completing online translation training programs but not all of these are immediately obvious. Completing your training online may or may not be the best option for your unique situation but it is important to at least be cognizant of the differences upfront before you enroll within any program. If you haven't considered these items in the past they may be able to save you over $2,000 over the next few years.

24/7 Support and Learning Resources: Traditional schools are setup to provide you with customer service and support during business hours. Online translation training programs are setup to help you find answers efficiently at any time of the day with online forums, extensive FAQs, click to chat services, and more responsive email and phone call support as well.

More Value - Less Tuition: Traditional schools typically provide a lecture which is 1.5-2 hours in length. Why is this? One of the main reasons is that it takes a certain level of effort to get the professor and all of the students in the same room at the same time, so once this is accomplished you may as well fit in a few hours of training. What is wrong with this is that extensive scientifically backed research shows that most professionals start to lose focus and stop paying attention after 20-40 minutes and no studies have provided conclusive evidence that watching someone lecture for over an hour straight is a productive method of instruction. If you enroll into an online translation training program the host organization does not have to force you to sit through 2 hours straight of lecture, video or audio resources can be broken up into concise, focused 5-20 minute segments which help you learn about one idea at a time or skip over supplemental videos if they cover an area which you are already familiar with. This is just one of the ways in which completing your translation training online can provide you with more value while typically paying 30-70% less in tuition.

Adaptive and Dynamic: Online translation training programs are typically built based on industry best practices, industry demands, and participant requests. This is in contrast to more traditional school-based programs which are provided on-campus and are typically structured around theory, a textbook, or a single professor's knowledge. While most on campus translation training programs completely change their course matter and subjects as professors come and go within departments online training programs typically are constantly building our their coverage of the niche area, always adapting, evolving, and improving. This is possible because knowledge is passed through digital media such as video and audio resources instead of being held in someone's mind and class notes of what "should be taught."

Time is Money: Everyone's time is worth something whether that is $6/hour or $60/hour you need to calculate what this number is in your case and calculate commuting costs to complete an in-person course or examination vs. an online training program. I believe if you take moderate estimates of this wasted time into account you will see that your commuting time is costing you almost as much if not more than the tuition. For example, if your time is worth $27 an hour and you spend just 40 minutes commuting each way to campus every week for 16 weeks that total cost of your time is $576. What is the real cost of not getting trained online?

Superior Alumni Benefits: Since online translation training programs must develop video and audio based resources it is much easier to then offer these same resources or related online training modules to alumni for little or no extra cost. The result is that alumni are actually treated like valuable members of a community instead of just someone that a more traditional school may contact for a donation to their foundation after a few years. Traditional universities and campuses must pay for their buildings, land, and overhead so in the end you are either paying an online training organization to develop great resources or you are paying more for a campus to keep up maintenance on their buildings and land. Which is more valuable to you and your career? A good example of how this is unfolding in other industries can be found in the movie rental business. In this industry everyone is asking themselves: Why pay $5 per movie rental to pay for someone's building, electricity, and overhead when you can pay $10 or less a month and rent several movies through Netflix?
I hope these benefits of online translation training help you decide whether these types of programs are right for you. If you have some follow up questions feel free to contact our team or read more about our Certified Translation Professional (CTP) program on TranslationCertification.org

-By Adriana Tassini

Register or learn more about the Certified Translation Professional (CTP) Certification.

Tags: Online Translation Training, Online Translation Training Program, Translation Training Online, online Translation Training Programs, training programs for translation professionals

Free Membership

Global Translation Institute Association

The Global Translation Institute (GTI) is a growing international professional networking association. The GTI was founded to create an international forum of translation professionals who openly help and offer resources for others to advance their careers and business interests.

The GTI sponsors the Certified Translation Professional (CTP) Designation Program. This is the only online certification training and certification program available in the industry. To learn more please see http://TranslationCertification.org.

Free Membership: Our association is now hosted through Linkedin.com. To join the Global Translation Institute (GTI) association for free, please click here.

The following Translator Q & A is part of our Translator FAQ Series. Question: Answer: Learn more:
Tags: Global Translation Institute Association, Translation Association, Free Translation Association. http://www.becomeatranslator.com/

GenuLingua Inc. Job Post


Job Opportunity for Translator

GenuLingua Inc. is currently looking to interview and hire certified translators and editors in Spanish, Portuguese, French, and Russian with at least 2 years of experience.

If interested and qualified please email a copy of your resume, with a minimum of 3 professional references to jessica.y.gonzales@gmail.com

-Adriana Tassini

Translator Training Video Platform

Translator Training Video Platform

The following videos are supplemental materials meant to provide additional insights, training, and best practices from our team directly to you.

We are recording new videos every month, if you wish we had a video on a particular topic please email use and we will do our best to create that video resource for you within 1 month.

Our Free Translator Training Videos:

Top 5 Translation Career Mistakes

Top 5 Translation Career Mistakes

Our team at the Global Translation Institute (GTI) just completed a new video as part of our Translator Training Video Platform Series. This video is called ”Top 5 Translation Career Mistakes.” This video along with more exclusive videos are all included for participants within our translation certification program, the CTP Designation. We hope you enjoy the video!



This video module is one of over 50 available within the Certified Translation Professional (CTP) program, feel to view all of the free videos we provide within our Translator Video Library.
Tags: Top 5 Translation Career Mistakes, Translation Mistakes, How to avoid mistakes in the Translation Career.

A Typical Working Day As A Professional Translator

A Typical Working Day As A Professional Translator

Below is a short video our team just produced which provides an overview of what a typical working day and typical responsibilities are for a professional translator. This video is part of our Translator Training Video Platform series being produced as a part of the resources we provide to participants within our online translation training and certification program. – The Global Translation Institute (GTI) Team.




This video module is one of over 50 available within the Certified Translation Professional (CTP) program, feel to view all of the free videos we provide within our Translator Video Library.

Tags: A Typical Working Day As A Professional Translator, A Typical Day of a Translator, Translator's Typical Working Day, Working as a Translator.

Tips For Starting a Freelance Translation Business

Tips For Starting a Freelance Translation Business

This video module provides you with some strategies that you can use to start your own translation agency. If you are interested in this topic you should also listen to all of our expert audio interviews which are included within your CTP tuition dues and available right here within TranslatorTraining.com. (Download this Video in MP4 Format)



This video module is one of over 50 available within the Certified Translation Professional (CTP) program, feel to view all of the free videos we provide within our Translator Video Library.
Tags: Tips For Starting a Freelance Translation Business, Freelance Translators, Starting as a Freelancer, How to Start a Translation Business.

How Do I Become a Translator?

How Do I Become a Translator?

If you are interested in becoming a translator, there are a few things you need to know. Like any profession you may be interested in, you will first want to make sure you understand what a translator does. You can do this one of many ways. And you will probably want to check out everything you can to fully understand this new career path.

First, reading books to find out what a translator does and what they typically do for a job is helpful. You will want to read as many books and articles as you can. You can find books in your local library, as well as periodical that have to do with the industry. You can also search online and read about the field and what a person who is a translator does.

Next, you may want to find someone who is currently a translator and talk to them. If you know someone, then that’s where you want to start. If you do not know anyone currently working as a translator, you can search online for companies that employ translators or you can even try a local college.
It is important to remember that the job of a translator is broad and many people in the field may specialize in a particular area. You will want to research what niche areas are common for a translator and decide if one of those areas of expertise are more appealing to you.

Knowing as much as you can about the industry, including what kinds of work and educational requirements are common, is vital. In order to get into a new field, having all the information you need to make you knowledgeable is the key to helping you find a job in your desired field as a translator.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Landing Your Next Translator Job Interview

Landing Your Next Translator Job Interview

Getting your foot in the door can be the most important step to getting your next translator job. But how do you get in front of the people that do the hiring to show them you are the best person for the job?

Sending out resumes and waiting for a phone call is not how to get yourself a job. Today’s job market is highly competitive, especially for those interested in working as translators, and you have to make yourself stand out from the crowd. How aggressive you are with this is up to you.

One way to get the attention of a prospective employer is to call up a company of interest and ask them when a good time for you to come in and tell them about what you have to offer to their company. You may even chose to propose a date.

For a more subtle approach you can call up the company and inquire about potential translator openings, offering how your training and background would be a good fit. This can be an excellent way of facilitating a conversation with the company about what you have to offer without being too pushy.

Many translator job seekers make the mistake of accepting the first no they hear as a final answer. However, if you are persistent and don’t take no for an answer, you will be surprised at how you can turn a no into a yes quickly and get that interview you are hoping for.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

How to Earn More Money as a Translator

How to Earn More Money as a Translator

Being a translator is a busy and sometimes stressful job. The job of a translator can be very involved and time-consuming. Therefore, it is important to get paid for the work you do. If you are doing your job to the best of your ability, you may feel it’s time to get some more money for your hard work. If this is your case, you will want to try some of these suggestions to help you earn more money in your field.

The most important thing you can do to earn more money as a translator is do your job thoroughly and effectively. It is important to always be aware of the bottom line and ensure you are making decisions that positively affect the company and the money that it makes.

You will also want to make sure that you are conscious of the image that you give for your company. Though you don’t have to be liked by everyone per se, being a team player and getting along with your coworker, both your superiors and your subordinates, is important to keeping a high morale in the workplace. Everyone knows high morale equals high performance.

You will also want to make sure you stay ahead of what is happening in your field. Translation trends are always changing. Knowing what is hot and what is not in the field of translation can make you very marketable within your field and therefore make you a valuable asset to your company. When you are valuable your company will likely pay you accordingly to keep you on their team.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

The Advantages of Having a Translator Mentor

The Advantages of Having a Translator Mentor

There are many advantages of having a translator mentor. Mentors can provide you with valuable insight into your profession as well as into your personal translator practices. If you are just starting in the field of translator, a mentor can provide you with networking opportunities and connections that you may not be able to get via any other avenue. So, if you want to get ahead or stay ahead in the translation field, a mentor can be a very beneficial tool.


There are two
main types of mentors that you will want to consider. There are mentors that work in your current company as well as mentors that work in your field but not at your current company. There are advantages to each type of mentor. Having a translator mentor at your place of employment can give you someone to talk to about your current position that knows the ins and outs of your current company and can help you navigate through the hierarchy of your company.

A translator mentor that is in your field but is not employed by your current company can be an advantage because it gives you someone that can be open and honest to you in regard to your personal types and your current job situation. If you are not yet employed in the field, a translator mentor can help you network and possibly find a job.

Having a translator mentor is an excellent way to establish a relationship with someone in your field that has experience, knowledge and connections that can help you succeed in the field of translation. A mentor can be an excellent way to show you are serious about succeeding as a translator.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

The Advantages of Acquiring a Translator Certification

The Advantages of Acquiring a Translator Certification

The translator field is a competitive one and therefore standing out from the crowd is essential. One of the best ways to stand out is to have experience, education or skills that the typical translator professional does not have. A good way to do this is to acquire a translator certification.

A translator certification can give you a leg up in your field whether you are applying for a new position or trying to get into the field for the first time. A certification is a great way to get noticed over the rest of the applicants. Though a degree can be very valuable as well, a certification can be a more concise and less time-consuming way to get added experience and skills.

Whether you acquire a translator certification in a classroom or online, having the added value of a certification is an excellent way to acquire training and skills that other applicants in the field may not have. The advantage that a certification can provide could mean the difference between having your resume pushed aside and landing your next translator job.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Translator Resume Tips

Translator Resume Tips

Whether you are looking to land your first job in translation or hoping to find a more challenging or lucrative job in your field, it is vital to have a resume that gets attention and makes you stand out. Having a resume that not only highlights your current position but the education and experience that you have acquired is important in the preparation of your resume.

Your resume is the first opportunity for a potential employer to see you and your qualification. As a translator professional, especially starting out in the field, you will want to highlight the skills you have not solely work history on your resume. Having a resume that highlights your skills can be the difference between landing an interview and being put to the side with the other candidates.

Translation is a tough field and you will need to do whatever you can to set yourself apart from the group and focusing on your skills rather than your job history is definitely a way to do that. Of course, your job history is important and must be included. However, a resume that is different and highlights the skills that that you can bring to the table will set you out in front of other translator applicants. This is the best way to ensure that you land an interview and maybe even be offered that next translator job.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Benefits of Continuing Education in Translation

Benefits of Continuing Education in Translation

There are many benefits to continuing your education in the field of translation. Whether you are a translator or just starting out in the translation field, continuing education can mean the difference between getting a job or promotion or not.

There are various ways to get continuing education in your field. You can return to school and get a formal degree or you can consider a certification in the translation field. There are various schools that offer continuing education.

A certification in the field of translation can be very beneficial. When applying for a job or promotion within your field, having a certification that other applicants do not have can put you ahead of the other being considered.

Attaining a Master’s degree can also make your resume stand out. However, a formal degree is not always necessary. In the field of translation, a certification can be just as valuable as a formal degree, so you will need to research and decide which the best choice is for you and your continuing education venture.

If you are undecided
as to which path is best for your career advancement, a mentor or supervisor can be an excellent resource in helping make your decision. But no matter whether you choose a class or two at a local college or a translation certification or degree, continuing to stay ahead in your field and know about the latest trends and innovations in translation can really put you ahead when you try for your next promotion or job.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

3 Tips for Making Your Translator Resume Stand Out

3 Tips for Making Your Translator Resume Stand Out

Today’s job market is very competitive. If you are looking for a new job or trying to get your foot in the door in translation, you will want to do everything you can to make yourself stand out from other applicants. One of the best ways to stand out is to make certain your resume will get noticed.

Though everyone has their own opinion on how a resume should be written, there are some basic tips you can use to make sure your resume gets noticed.

One of the most important things you can do with your resume is to keep it up-to-date. Remembering to keep your resume updated with continuing education, volunteer work and experience can ensure you have a resume ready whenever you need it.

Next you will want to make sure that you update your resume style to reflect what companies today want to see. A traditional resume is typically not what a company is looking for. Plus it is not always in your best interest to use a chronological resume. You may want to consider a using a functional resume where you highlight experiences and skills.

Lastly, utilizing a career summary at the top of your resume can truly make certain that your resume stands out and is easy to read. Those narrowing down the pile of resumes for a translator job opening may only peruse your resume for important skills, education, and experience to decide whether they want to read it in detail. Having a career summary can ensure you get the important information at the top of your resume.

Using these tips can help make your resume up-to-date and easy to read. Having a great resume can be the difference between getting that next translator job and having to continue your search.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Asking for More Responsibility as a Translator

Asking for More Responsibility as a Translator

As a translator, you may be hoping to continue your career path and work your way up in management. In order to do this you will need to continue to take on added responsibilities and projects to show you are ready for the next level in your field.

If you are ready to take on more responsibilities in hopes of showing your boss that you are ready for your next advancement, you will need to ask for these responsibilities. The best way to ask your boss for additional tasks and responsibilities is to make certain you are completing your current tasks and responsibilities well and in a timely manner. Then you will need to be certain that you can fit these added responsibilities into your already busy day.

Most translators already have a day that is jam packed with tasks and responsibilities therefore
finding the time for more tasks can be difficult. One way to free up some of your time is to recognize a subordinate who is ready for additional responsibilities and delegate some of your smaller or more tedious tasks to them. This will help their career as well as free up some of your time so you can concentrate on more important tasks that will help you advance.

Understanding
how to prioritize and delegate can be a very important part of advancing and will make asking your boss for more important responsibilities easier. When your boss sees that you can properly and effectively prioritize, manage your time, and delegate, he will quickly see that you are ready for added responsibilities and possibly advancement in your career as a translator.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Formal Education and Its Importance to a Translator

Formal Education and Its Importance to a Translator

One of the questions you may have been asking yourself is whether or not a degree is important to your career as a translator. This is a common question that people ask as they consider a career in translation or as they advance up the company ladder.

If you are wondering if formal education is important to your career, you will want to ask around and see what those that are successful in your field are saying. Asking your boss, your mentor, or even your human resources department can be very helpful in deciding how important a degree can be to career advancement in the field of translation.

Doing some online research can also be helpful. You can probably find statistic of who gets hired or advanced in your field and what percentage have a formal education or degree or not. This can also be valuable in helping your make your decision.

Something else you will want to consider is whether formal education will help you make more money in comparison to the cost of the program. Understanding how much a degree or other types of formal education will costs in relation to how much more companies pay someone with a degree will be good information to have. You may find that the cost of the program is much more than the small amount more a company will pay you for having the degree.

However,
if there is a particular company you want to work for you may want to contact them directly to find out if they require any type of formal education. If you are currently employed as a translator, you will want to ask those higher up in your company whether formal education will be required for advancement. Taking all this information into account can help you make an educated decision on whether formal education is necessary for your career in translation.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Know What Is Important to Your Boss in Translation

Know What Is Important to Your Boss in Translation

Knowing what is important to your boss can make certain you are prioritizing your day or week properly. In translation, completing the tasks that are important to your boss in a timely manner can make certain you look good and therefore ensuring your job is secure with the company. In today’s fluctuating job market, having a sense of job security is important to just about everyone.

If you are unsure of what is important to your boss – ask. It never hurts to ask or clear up any uncertainties with your boss. In fact, many supervisors will find it refreshing that you are making certain you understand what they are asking and subsequently know that you want to ensure you are giving them what they want.

In the long run, taking a moment to speak with your boss about expectations, priorities, or particulars about a project can save time overall. Making certain that you are clear on the details of a project or task will not only save time, it will make sure that you don’t waste your time and energy doing something that is unnecessary and helps make sure that deadlines are met. Knowing what is important to your boss can help ensure your success as a translator.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Working Smarter in Translation

Working Smarter in Translation

Being productive and organized are keys to being a successful translator. Whether you have been working in your field for years or just starting out, learning to work smarter can be a very important part of your day.

With so much competition for jobs today, ensuring you are valuable to your team and company is a sure-fire way to make certain that your job is not in jeopardy. Learning to work smarter and faster can help you be a key player for your company.

So what does working smarter mean? What working smarter means is that you are organized, concise and not wasteful of your time or the time of others. The best way to achieve this in your day is to be clear on your goals and organized in working toward meeting deadlines and goals.

Taking a few minutes at the beginning of each day to review your tasks, deadlines, and to-do list can help you get a clear picture of what needs to be accomplished in your day. You will then want to prioritize your tasks and possibly write down your list so you don’t get side-tracked or off course during your day. Taking a few minutes in the morning can make your day run more smoothly and keep you contributing to the success of your company and ultimately your career.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

The Importance of a Cover Letter When Applying for a Translation Job

The Importance of a Cover Letter When Applying for a Translation Job

Writing a cover letter is a very important part of the job application process. If you are just entering the field of translation or looking to make a job move, sending out resumes is an essential step to your job search. One of the most important parts of your resume is the cover letter.

The cover letter is the letter that you send to a potential employer along with your resume. It allows you to introduce yourself to the company and highlight your education, skills, and experience that make you the right person for the job to which you are applying. The cover letter should be addressed directly to the person that will be reviewing it. Therefore you will want to do some research and determine to whom the cover letter will need to be addressed. Usually this is a manager or a human resources person.

The cover letter should be as personal as possible. This is one of the ways for you to stand out from the crowd of applicants. In translation, most jobs are heavily sought after and therefore anything you can do to set yourself apart from the other applicants is critical. Making your cover letter personal and concise is an excellent way to get your resume noticed.

In today’s competitive market, anything you can do to stand out from the crowd is important. In translation, this can be vital. Therefore, make certain you do your research regarding the company and the job to which you are applying, list your skills, education, and experience in a well-written and concise manner, and be sure to proofread. You do not want something as small as a misspelled word to keep you from that next job interview.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

How Much To Charge When You Start Working As a Translator

How Much To Charge When You Start Working As a Translator

The video module answers the common question that our team answers regarding what you should charge when you start out working as a translator. This video should be very helpful to those of you who are trying to determine what your rate should be set at. (Download this Video in MP4 Format)



This video module is one of over 50 available within the Certified Translation Professional (CTP) program, feel to view all of the free videos we provide within our Translator Video Library.
Tags: How Much To Charge When You Start Working As a Translator, How to Begin Working as a Professional Translator.

How To Get A Translation Industry Internship

How To Get A Translation Industry Internship

This video will provide you with detailed steps and bullet point type advice on exactly how to get an internship within the translation industry.



This video module is one of over 50 available within the Certified Translation Professional (CTP) program, feel to view all of the free videos we provide within our Translator Video Library.
Tags: How To Get A Translation Industry Internship, Getting an Internship in the Translation Industry, Translation Training, Translator Internship.

Tips For Starting a Freelance Translation Business

Tips For Starting a Freelance Translation Business

This video module provides you with some strategies that you can use to start your own translation agency. If you are interested in this topic you should also listen to all of our expert audio interviews which are included within your CTP tuition dues and available right here within TranslatorTraining.com. (Download this Video in MP4 Format)



This video module is one of over 50 available within the Certified Translation Professional (CTP) program, feel to view all of the free videos we provide within our Translator Video Library.
Tags: Translator Training, How to Start a Freelance Translation Business, Starting a Translation Company, How to Start a Translation Agency Business.

Translation Training | Three Types of Proofreading

Translation Training: Three Types of Proofreading

This video module is a follow up on our other proofreading video and it provides you with three different types of proofreading that you can perform. Using these techniques is very important in producing work for clients that will earn you repeat projects in the future so don’t skip over these proofreading strategies while studying for the CTP examination. (Download this Video in MP4 Format)



This video module is one of over 50 available within the Certified Translation Professional (CTP) program, feel to view all of the free videos we provide within our Translator Video Library.
Tags: Translator Training, Translator Proofreading, How to Proofread a Translation Project,

Translator Career Improvement Strategies (Video Module)

Translator Career Improvement Strategies


Below please find a short video module providing some practical career improvement strategies for translators.




This video module is one of over 50 available within the Certified Translation Professional (CTP) program, feel to view all of the free videos we provide within our Translator Video Library.
Tags: translator career strategies, translator career video, translator career improvement, translator career advice.

Where is the best place to find work as a translation professional?

Where is the best place to find work as a translation professional?

The internet is THE marketplace. Business social networks, particularly LinkedIn.com, have taken over much of the function of the work wanted ads in the classified section of the newspaper. So if you want to work for a corporation or an agency, your best bet is to search the internet for potential employers and make sure you have a good, relevant profile online, especially on LinkedIn. Translation networks such as GTI and the ATA have sections where clients can search for a professional as well, for freelancers and you can also get a large amount of work through online translator networks. Caveat emptor there, of course.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

How well understood is the translation profession?

How well understood is the translation profession?

It’s a mixed bag, overall. Most people think a translation professional is a simultaneous interpreter. While some of us do that, it’s a specific skill set, and not all of us possess it, either linguistically or temperamentally. The other common image of a translation professional is that of the solitary literary translator polishing his or her translation for years in a dusty, lonely attic garret. And then there’s the whole misapprehension of knowing a language vs. being able to translate it—another part of the profession in which someone who is multilingual may or may not possess the necessary skill set. Finally, there’s the whole notion of what it means to be bilingual or multilingual anyway.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

What have economic changes done to the translation industry?

What have economic changes done to the translation industry?

There are two words that cover this: globalization and recession. Both, interestingly enough, have created some of the same pressures on the translation industry, much as they have elsewhere in the world. To put it bluntly, when someone who is desperate to work from another part of the world can do what you can do for less, it becomes harder to earn a living, despite one’s productivity or professionalism, or the differing quality of the product. The recession has put some clients out of business, as well, and has put legitimate downward pressure on what one can ask a client to pay. So a translation professional increasingly needs to either specialize or differentiate his or herself, in order to earn a decent living.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Are translation professionals independent workers, or do they work in teams?

Are translation professionals independent workers, or do they work in teams?

The answer is yes. Okay, that’s a joke, and not a very good one. But still, the answer is yes. Translation professionals must be able to work independently, particularly if they are freelancers, but even if they aren’t. But they also have to be able to work in teams—either as a group of back translation proofreaders, as a member of an agency, or even as a team that’s working on a large text or large group of texts. Certain agencies, for example, have a constant flow of huge work—often involving contracts or litigation—that need to be translated as of yesterday. Collaborating with fellow translators for such projects will be crucial—and that’s only one way in which a team will be involved. It’s also great to work with other professionals: each brings different skills to the table, and the many eyes involved, within reason, catch more errors than just one pair. So both of those are true.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Are jobs in translation fast-paced? If so, why?

Are jobs in translation fast-paced? If so, why?

They can be—and often are.

With translators from across the globe working for agencies that can be located half a world away, and with software allowing translation professionals to process double or triple their former workload—or even more, translation professionals work hard, smart, and fast. Project managers have to be able to keep up with the quickly changing demands of varied projects, whether they work within a company or for an agency. And translation professionals who focus on localization have to be able to respond to the needs of different markets in a creative and timely fashion. Finally, if you’re freelance translation professional and get most of your work through an online network, you have to be ready to bid on an international project at a moment’s notice—and then do it with a quick turnaround as well. And conference translation can be quite fast-paced and demanding.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Is translation something that is dealt with mostly in the US, or is it truly an international industry?

Is translation something that is dealt with mostly in the US, or is it truly an international industry?

It’s truly an international industry. If anything, I’d say that the U.S. lags here, as until recently, it was less important for parts of the U.S. than in parts of the world where nationals from one country cross boundaries daily. Now, though, in part as a result of 9/11, but also as one aspect of trends in immigration and globalization, translation is a virtual necessity for almost every corner of the globe. So an American translator may find him or herself working in the U.S.—but if they’re interested, they might well find themselves traveling to and/ or working in exotic locations—or even familiar, more traditional ones, such as the E.U. With China joining the global community with a bang in the last 10-15 years, the changes in the Middle East (the Nile revolution, for example), and the catastrophic events in Japan (the 2011 earthquake and tsunami), translation is dealt with everywhere.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

How fast is the translation industry growing?

How fast is the translation industry growing?

The translation industry is an incredibly dynamic field. Globalization has been an important aspect of the world’s economy since the 90s, and the growth has been log rhythmic rather than geometrical. The translation field is participating in that surge, both in terms of the need for qualified translators in less traditional languages and the drastic increase in citizens and visitors to the U.S. who are not fluent in English. Schools, governments, companies, and so forth need to have their materials available in multiple languages, individuals who aren’t fluent in English need help when they encounter the medical or judicial system, our post-9/11 security requires a quick and deep understanding of communications from across the globe, and software makes it possible to handle double or triple the workload, compared to a decade ago. These are just a few aspects of how the industry is growing—and there are many more.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags:

Are there any regulations or laws that translation specialists need to pay special attention to?

Are there any regulations or laws that translation specialists need to pay special attention to?

Translation specialists who work in the medical or legal industry probably need to be aware of liability issues and laws. Freelancers probably have the largest burden, as they need to make sure they take care of the requirements set out by their municipality, county, and state—as well as any federal regulations. These requirements can include business licensing, paying income taxes, professional liability insurance, and the like. If a translator isn’t a citizen of the U.S., they need to follow whatever the legal requirements are there, and if they hire workers, they need to make sure those workers or other translation professionals are also legally able to work in the U.S., as well as paying the appropriate taxes (payroll, social security, etc.). And if a translation professional works for the government, there may be, I believe, other regulations as well, involving confidentiality, government secrets and security clearances, etc.

-By Adriana Tassini

The following Translator Q & A
is part of our Translator FAQ Series.Question:Answer: Learn more:Tags: